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Always New: A Paradox — Part One

If you really think about it, stuff mostly only wears out because it is used, and mostly because it is used the wrong way. But what if there were a way to exist and to function without being used?

Ok, back to the idea of ‘used the wrong way’ for a sec.

Take a zipper, for example. If a zippered garment is carefully handled, and if the zipper itself is never drawn without being positioned in a way that eliminates friction and stress on the parts, and if environmental conditions are ideal (no dust, moisture, temperature of consequence) then it will basically last forever. It will essentially never wear out unless the materials it is constructed from naturally decay, or until the micro-abrasions that do occur from normal wear and tear finally render it mechanically unsound.

You and I are a lot like this zipper, in a way. If all else has gone well, then, when we are treated with care, and operating in a way according with our natural design, we will remain physically and mentally sound for pretty much 120 years or so. “If all else has gone well” is an incredibly narrow scope of a clause in this world, however, and basically eliminates almost everyone on earth.

Literally, it pretty much eliminates everyone.

This is because we are all living in an unspeakably powerful and ongoing catastrophe here on this Earth. Ideal circumstances almost never happen. There is always collateral damage of some variety going on everywhere, no matter what. Life’s not fair.

However.

Once a human being has become sufficiently aware to realize enough of the what that is going on, then it is possible to sort of tune out the how, and to exist in a state of simply being present, without fear…and inasmuch as this state can be achieved and maintained — without anxiety, or judgment, or grief — then the bio-psycho-social processes of life can happen without the various types of friction that affect decay.

Easier said than done, but we are speaking in theoreticals, here.

I can make words.

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